Imac Apple

21.5-inch and 27-inch displays.
The new iMac has come a long way from the first 15-inch iMac. Take one look and you’ll see just how far. A 21.5-inch or 27-inch display with edge-to-edge glass covers nearly the entire front of the enclosure. When all you see is the display, nothing gets between you and what’s onscreen. Movies, TV shows, websites, photos — everything looks stunning on the new 16:9 widescreen iMac display

LED backlighting.
When a display has more pixels, you need to push more light through them to achieve the best picture possible. LED backlighting in the new iMac does exactly that, with remarkable brightness and efficiency. Because the LED backlight doesn’t take up much space, the iMac enclosure stays thin — even with all the high-performance components inside.
Higher resolution.

The new 21.5-inch iMac features 1920-by-1080 HD resolution. Apple engineers could simply have stretched that resolution up and out for the 27-inch iMac. Instead, they took the display well beyond HD with 2560-by-1440 resolution. That’s 78 percent more pixels than the 21.5-inch iMac.
IPS technology.

The iMac display is designed to look great from almost any angle. A technology called in-plane switching (IPS) makes this possible. Whether you’re sitting in front of the display or standing off to the side, you’ll get a perfect picture with superb color consistency and no loss of detail.

All-in-one simplicity.
Evolution of iMac.
It was a great idea then, and it’s a great idea now. The all-in-one design of the first flat-panel iMac cleaned up the desktop. It put everything you need — display, processor, graphics card, hard drive, optical drive, memory, and more — inside one simple enclosure. New technology inside and out makes the new iMac a worthy addition to the all-in-one dynasty.
Seamless enclosure.

While you’ll find a collection of ports on the back of iMac, you won’t find much else. A seamless, precision-forged enclosure makes the back one continuous aluminum surface. And there’s only one cord: the power cord.
Cool, quiet components.

The wider iMac display allows more room to separate the two hottest components, the CPU and the GPU. This keeps things cool inside the iMac enclosure. Apple engineers also implemented an intelligent control system that monitors temperatures and delivers just the right amount of airflow to critical components. And the three fans inside iMac have been tuned to be ultraquiet. The result of all this tinkering with heat and sound? A system that operates at 18 decibels when idle — so quiet, you hardly know it’s on.*


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iPhone

The Fastest iPhone Ever
The first thing you’ll notice about iPhone 3GS is how quickly you can launch applications. Web pages render in a fraction of the time, and you can view email attachments faster. Improved performance and updated 3D graphics deliver an incredible gaming experience, too. In fact, everything you do on iPhone 3GS is up to 2x faster and more responsive than iPhone 3G.

Video
Now you can shoot video, edit it, and share it — all on your iPhone 3GS. Shoot high-quality VGA video in portrait or landscape. Trim your footage by adjusting start and end points. Then share your video in an email, post it to your MobileMe gallery, publish it on YouTube, or sync it back to your Mac or PC using iTunes.

Camera
The new 3-megapixel camera takes great still photos, too, thanks to built-in autofocus and a handy new feature that lets you tap the display to focus on anything (or anyone) you want.

Voice Control
Voice Control recognizes the names in your Contacts and knows the music on your iPod. So if you want to place a call or play a song, all you have to do is ask.

Compass
With a built-in digital compass, iPhone 3GS can point the way. Use the new Compass app, or watch as it automatically reorients maps to match the direction you’re facing

Cut, Copy & Paste
Cut, copy, and paste words and photos, even between applications. Copy and paste images and content from the web, too.

Landscape Keyboard
Want more room to type on the intelligent software keyboard? Rotate iPhone to landscape to use a larger keyboard in Mail, Messages, Notes, and Safari.

Messages
Send messages with text, video, photos, audio, locations, and contact information. You can even forward one or more messages to others.

Search
Find what you’re looking for across your iPhone, all from one convenient place. Spotlight searches all your contacts, email, calendars, and notes, as well as everything in your iPod.

Accessibility
iPhone 3GS offers accessibility features to assist users who are visually or hearing impaired. These features include the VoiceOver screen reader, a Zoom feature, White on Black display options, Mono Audio, and more.

Internet Tethering
Surf the web from practically anywhere. Now you can share the 3G connection on your iPhone with your Mac notebook or PC laptop. Tethering is not currently offered in the U.S. and some other countries. See your carrier for availability.

Voice Memos
Capture and share a thought, a memo, a meeting, or any audio recording on the go with the new Voice Memos application.

Nike + iPod
iPhone includes built-in Nike + iPod support. Just slip the Nike + iPod Sensor (available separately) into your Nike+ shoe and start your workout.


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ipod Shuffle

You’ll never hear your music in the same way again, all thanks to VoiceOver. Say you’re listening to a song and want to know the title or the artist. With the press of a button, VoiceOver tells you without interrupting your music. It’s such a simple and clever way to navigate your collection, VoiceOver is entertainment itself.

And the fun doesn’t stop with songs. VoiceOver also tells you the names of your playlists, so you can easily switch between them to find the right mix for your mood. Without having to take your eyes off your run, your ride, or whatever you’re doing.

How it works.

iPod shuffle is designed not only to talk, but to say the right things. How is this possible? First, iTunes reads your song information, then uses the VoiceOver Kit to generate the announcements for the songs, artists, and playlists. Just sync your iPod shuffle with your computer and it really speaks to you.

After you sync your iPod shuffle, the voice you hear depends on which computer system you use. If you sync your iPod shuffle with a PC or with a Mac running Mac OS X Tiger, you’ll hear the English voice included in the VoiceOver Kit. And since Mac OS X Leopard and Snow Leopard have an amazing English voice built in, that’s the voice you’ll hear when you sync your iPod shuffle with a Mac running one of those operating systems.


It speaks multiple languages.

Your music library has songs from all over the world — a love song from France, a bolero from Spain, or a pop tune from Japan. Luckily, VoiceOver speaks fluent song — in 20 languages, to be exact.

iTunes selects the language and best voice for your song titles and artist names. It looks at song data, like the title, artist, and album information, then applies intelligent algorithms to choose the right language. For example, iTunes recognizes the song “Ya Viene el Sol” by Ozomatli as a Spanish song, so your iPod shuffle will automatically speak that song title and artist in Spanish. If you prefer to hear that information spoken in another language, you can change the designated VoiceOver language for that song in iTunes.


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Dell Optiplex360

OptiPlex is Easy to Own
OptiPlex 360 is both easy to own and flexible to meet the changing needs of your organization. That means the right fit for users with choice of two form factors and practical features, such as Dell Client Manager that help reduce time needed from IT for deployment, maintenance and support. Dell OptiPlex reduces the hassle of ownership so you can focus on moving your organization forward.

OptiPlex Means Business
Keep your users productive and your organization running with the OptiPlex 360. OptiPlex helps you prepare for system changes with tools to plan ahead, including:

* Long system lifecycles
* Managed transitions
* Stable images
And OptiPlex offers customizable support options so that you can tailor the services to your needs.

OptiPlex Provides Security
Every business faces security challenges and every IT organization builds a unique security framework to address those risks. Whatever your data protections needs, the Dell OptiPlex 360 lets you match desktop security options to your organization's priorities with:

* Basic security offerings
* System and BIOS passwords to prevent unauthorized system access
* Chassis loop lock support for physical system protection

OptiPlex Gets Green
Dell is committed to being the greenest PC company on the planet with programs that help your company "be green" from the moment you order. And the OptiPlex 360 delivers, smart energy choices so that you can achieve more performance with less energy through Dell's Energy Smart power management. We'll even recycle your current desktops free of charge when you purchase your new OptiPlex 360. Find out today how OptiPlex systems reflect Dell's true understanding of the importance of green technologies to your company and to your company's bottom line.


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Dell Vostro 220st

DellTM VostroTM desktop solutions are designed exclusively with features to simplify the technology challenges of small business. Vostro delivers reliable performance backed by exceptional Dell support – all at a great value.

* No unwanted trialware. Fitted only with the software you want.
* Personalized telephone support from specially trained small business technicians available 24x7x365.
* Outstanding Dell reliability and hassle-free technology work overtime for small business.
* Security options help protect your system and data from unauthorized system access, malicious software attacks and loss of important data that can cripple your business.

Customer Driven Design Improvements

We listened and are delivering what you told us you need

* System designs that look good in any office environment. Attractive, easy to keep clean exteriors with glossy front and matte black sides and tops.
* Improved optical drive door design which allows for quick and easy access to media drives.
* Serial and PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports, so that you can continue to use your existing peripherals, such as barcode scanners and POS (point-of-sale) devices.

Key Features and Extended Capabilities

Small business demands big results. New features and extended capabilities can boost your productivity. Add advanced audio and video capabilities for the ultimate multi-media experience.

* Choose the level of processing performance you need from a range of the latest-generation Intel® Celeron® and Core™2 Duo processors.
* Enjoy great visual and image clarity with integrated Intel® GMA X4500HD graphics7 or an optional ATI Radeon® HD graphics card7.
* Run your general business applications and multi-task with up to 4GB6 of fast 800MHz DDR2 system memory7.
* Maximize system storage capacity with up to 1TB3 of hard drive space.
* Enable fast data transfer speed and network performance with the integrated 10/100/1000 Gigabit network adapter.

Services to Simplify Technology

When your business demands time, your technology shouldn’t. The compact Vostro 220s Slim Tower includes a comprehensive portfolio of small business support services and features.

* Receive personalized support from small business trained technicians.
* Get help where you need it when you need it with Dell ConnectTM , which allows tech support agents to troubleshoot and help repair system issues remotely.
* Tailor your service level – whatever your IT expertise – with optional Dell ProSupport services.
* Help protect your valuable data with optional Dell DataSafe Online Backup.

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Dell 220 MT

DellTM VostroTM desktop solutions are designed exclusively with features to simplify the technology challenges of small business. Vostro delivers reliable performance backed by exceptional Dell support – all at a great value.

* No unwanted trialware. Fitted only with the software you want.
* Personalized telephone support from specially trained small business technicians available 24x7x365.
* Outstanding Dell reliability and hassle-free technology work overtime for small business.
* Security options help protect your system and data from unauthorized system access, malicious software attacks and loss of important data that can cripple your business.

We listened and are delivering what you told us you need

* System designs that look good in any office environment. Attractive, easy to keep clean exteriors with glossy front and matte black sides and tops.
* Improved optical drive door design which allows for quick and easy access to media drives.
* Serial and PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports so that you can continue to use your existing peripherals, such as barcode scanners and POS (point-of-sale) devices.

Key Features and Extended Capabilities

Small business demands big results. New features and extended capabilities can boost your productivity. Add advanced audio and video capabilities for the ultimate multi-media experience.

* Choose the level of processing performance you need from a range of the latest-generation Intel® Celeron® and Core™2 Duo processors.
* Enjoy great visual and image clarity with integrated Intel® GMA X4500HD graphics6 or an optional ATI Radeon® HD graphics card6.
* Run your general business applications and multi-task with up to 4GB7 of fast 800MHz DDR2 system memory6.
* Maximize system storage capacity with up to 2TB3 of hard drive space.
* Enable fast data transfer speed and network performance with the integrated 10/100/1000 Gigabit network adapter.

Services to Simplify Technology

When your business demands time, your technology shouldn’t. The scalable Vostro 220 Mini Tower includes a comprehensive portfolio of small business support services and features.

* Receive personalized support from small business trained technicians.
* Get help where you need it when you need it with Dell ConnectTM , which allows tech support agents to troubleshoot and help repair system issues remotely.
* Tailor your service level – whatever your IT expertise – with optional Dell ProSupport services.
* Help protect your valuable data with optional Dell DataSafe Online Backup.

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HP Pavilion p6267c-b

HP's quad core-powered Pavilion p6267c-b ($999.99 list at Costco) delivers impressive multimedia power and big screen goodness at a very reasonable price. For under a grand you get a quad-core processor coupled with 8GB of system memory, a nice-size hard drive, a beautiful 25-inch LCD monitor, and Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit). There's even a dedicated graphics card, albeit a low-end one. All this earns it our Editors' Choice in the budget desktop category.

Design
On the outside, there's nothing to distinguish the p6267c-b from its siblings, the HP Pavilion p6207c-b and p6247c-b, as they all use the same sleek-looking matte black chassis with a silver-framed piano black front panel. In fact, this model uses the same Intel G33-based Benicia GL8E motherboard as the p6207c-b. A 15-in-1 card reader and two optical drive bays sit above a 3.5-inch expansion bay, and there are headphone and microphone jacks and two USB ports hiding behind a sliding panel.

Around back are four additional USB ports, a gigabit Ethernet port, a FireWire port. There are two PS/2 ports, which is curious considering HP left these legacy ports off of it Pavilion Elite e9160f model. You also get digital audio in and out connections and six 8-channel audio jacks. Video is supplied by an ATI Radeon HD 4350 graphics card with 512MB of memory, which is installed in the lone 16X PCIe slot and offers HDMI, VGA, and DVI connectivity. One traditional PCI slot and two 1X PCIe slots are available for expansion, and there's room for one additional hard drive, a secondary optical drive, and a 3.5-inch drive, but make sure you don't max out the 300-watt power supply before installing any new components.

Features
Movie buffs will love the brightly lit 25-inch HP 2509m LCD monitor that is included in this bundle. With a native resolution of 1,920 by 1,080 and a 16:9 aspect ratio, it can display high definition movies in their native format without stretching or sacrificing image quality, and its color quality is very good. The monitor has three video inputs (HDMI, DVI, and VGA) so you can switch between several sources, such as a gaming console, the p6267c-b itself, and a Blu-ray player, without having to swap out cables. The 2509m sells for $349.99 on HP's Web site if bought separately.

The lack of a Blu-ray drive is disappointing considering the system is bundled with an HD-capable monitor and is HDMI ready. Instead, the 6267c-b comes with a multi-format recordable DVD drive with LightScribe labeling capabilities. On the other hand, the 750GB hard drive provides a generous amount of storage. It comes with Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit) and a couple of handy apps, such as HP's MediaSmart multimedia suite and Cyberlink's DVD editing and burning suite. In typical HP fashion, the drive is burdened with bloatware, including trial versions of Norton Internet Security and Microsoft Office 2007, NetZero and Juno dial-up adware, and gobs of Wild Tangent games.
HP Pavilion 6267 c-b

Performance
With a 2.5GHz Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300 processor and a whopping 8GB of DDR2 RAM, the p6267c-b managed to edge past the Editors' Choice Dell Inspiron 545 on several of our benchmark tests. It PCMark Vantage score of 6,500 was almost 2,000 point higher than the Dell 545 (4,529) and was 32% faster than the Lenovo IdeaCentre K220 (4,922), another Editors' Choice system. It finished our Windows Media Encoder test in 41 seconds, which was only 1 second faster than the Dell 545 and 5 seconds faster than the Lenovo K220, but faster nonetheless. The p6267c-b completed our PhotoShop CS4 test in1 minute 35 seconds, beating the Lenovo K550 by 7 seconds but lagging behind the Dell 545 by 5 seconds.

Although the p6267c-b comes with an ATI Radeon HD 4350 discrete graphics card, it is by no means a gaming system. It managed a paltry 16.5 frames per second (fps) on our Crysis 3D test, and that was at a low resolution with medium effects enabled. A score of 17 fps on our World in Conflict test, also set to medium, is a pretty good indication that this configuration will disappoint the hardcore gaming crowd.

Lots of memory and a quad-core CPU give the HP Pavilion p6267c-b all the horsepower you'll need to handle your multimedia workloads with relative ease. It stacks up nicely against the Dell Inspiron 545, our previous Editors' Choice for this category, for several reasons: Its productivity performance is superior, it comes with a bigger monitor, and it includes a dedicated graphics card. Even with the bloatware, the p6267c-b delivers more bang for your buck, which earns it our Editors' Choice for value desktops.

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Apple iMac 27-inch

When it comes to the all-in-one desktop market, the Apple iMac is the standard bearer. And, like any other industry-leading product, this makes it a target for all of Apple's competitors. The unveiling of the new configuration is an annual event for the Apple faithful, and this year's was no exception. As an added bonus, the exterior of the iMac 27-inch (Core 2 Duo) ($1,699 list) has been updated along with the interior. The last iMac design refresh occurred in 2007, when the iMac went from a white plastic construction to mostly glass and aluminum. The 2009 update gives us a wider screen, even more aluminum replacing plastic, and a couple of neat new features. All that, and it offers a huge, high-resolution 27-inch screen. With a little tweaking, this desktop could replace the TV in your den, kitchen, or bedroom, while displaying crisp bright high-defintion video for all to see.

Design
At first glance, the iMac looks the same as the ones produced over the past few years, since the industrial design cues are so similar. Look closer and you'll notice the iconic protruding "Jay Leno chin" is slimmer, to the point that it takes up as much relative space as the speaker bar on other stylish all-in-one PCs or HDTVs. The black bezel around the screen helps the new look, since it now goes edge to edge, where before the bezel was ringed in aluminum. The iMac still floats over your desk, supported by a metal foot. Since the new iMac comes with a wireless mouse and keyboard, it's now even more of a minimal design statement; you only need one cord for power, as long as you have wireless networking. The back of the iMac is now matte-finish aluminum, where before it was black polycarbonate (plastic). This will no doubt make it prettier on TV shows and on cubicle desks.

When it comes to the all-in-one desktop market, the Apple iMac is the standard bearer. And, like any other industry-leading product, this makes it a target for all of Apple's competitors. The unveiling of the new configuration is an annual event for the Apple faithful, and this year's was no exception. As an added bonus, the exterior of the iMac 27-inch (Core 2 Duo) ($1,699 list) has been updated along with the interior. The last iMac design refresh occurred in 2007, when the iMac went from a white plastic construction to mostly glass and aluminum. The 2009 update gives us a wider screen, even more aluminum replacing plastic, and a couple of neat new features. All that, and it offers a huge, high-resolution 27-inch screen. With a little tweaking, this desktop could replace the TV in your den, kitchen, or bedroom, while displaying crisp bright high-defintion video for all to see.

Design
At first glance, the iMac looks the same as the ones produced over the past few years, since the industrial design cues are so similar. Look closer and you'll notice the iconic protruding "Jay Leno chin" is slimmer, to the point that it takes up as much relative space as the speaker bar on other stylish all-in-one PCs or HDTVs. The black bezel around the screen helps the new look, since it now goes edge to edge, where before the bezel was ringed in aluminum. The iMac still floats over your desk, supported by a metal foot. Since the new iMac comes with a wireless mouse and keyboard, it's now even more of a minimal design statement; you only need one cord for power, as long as you have wireless networking. The back of the iMac is now matte-finish aluminum, where before it was black polycarbonate (plastic). This will no doubt make it prettier on TV shows and on cubicle desks.
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The base iMacs (both 21.5-inch and 27-inch) now have 3.06-GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processors (a Core 2 Duo E7600 in this case), upgradeable to 3.33 GHz. The 27-inch system also comes with 4GB of DDR3 memory with an option for up to 16GB, a 1TB hard drive (you can get up to 2TB), ATI Radeon HD 4670 graphics (upgradable to a Radeon HD 4850 chip), and, like last year's model, the Apple Remote is now an optional extra. The 27-inch iMac can also be configured with a quad-core Core i5 or Core i7 processor, but those won't be available until November 2009.
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The 27-inch screen is LED backlit and is bright and clear. HD videos look great on the iMac, and the system is powerful enough to play 1080p videos smoothly in Quicktime, iTunes, or on the Web like on YouTube. The screen is viewable from a wide angle, a plus when more than one person is watching. The system lacks a Blu-ray option, but Apple is expecting you to buy your HD movies from iTunes or view them online anyway. I still wish Blu-ray was available if only for the ability to burn Blu-ray home movies and storage discs, and because Blu-ray movies would look great on the iMac. The system's 1TB 7,200rpm SATA drive is sufficient for most users: High-end graphics pros will want to upgrade to the 2TB option or connect an external drive via USB or FireWire 800. An eSATA connection is not an option on the iMac.
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Features
The 27-inch iMac's Mini DisplayPort can be used to connect one of Apple's 24-inch LED-backlit displays, or any other display with a DVI or VGA adapter. The connector can alternately work as a video-in port with an adapter. Theoretically this means you could hook up a Blu-ray player, satellite/cable box, or game console like a PS3 or Xbox 360 with a third-party HDMI cable to a Mini DisplayPort adapter. The drawback, of course, is that you have to find and buy the adapter separately. In a first for Apple desktops, the iMac now comes with an SD card slot—and only an SD card slot (there's no support for XD, Memory Stick Duo, and so on). It's better than nothing at least, and SD works in far more devices than any other digital card format.

All iMacs now come with a wireless keyboard and mouse, though the wired keyboard and mouse are still available as a no-cost option. We've looked at the Apple Wireless Keyboard in the past, and this version is still the same shortened aluminum chiclet keyboard as before. However, the new Apple Magic Mouse is a vast improvement over the old Mighty Mouse it replaces. The quirky side buttons and trackball scroller are gone; now the top of the mouse is a two-finger trackpad-like surface. It can be used for left and right click (you have to set up right click in the mouse's control panel), 360-degree scrolling on websites and in other windows, zoom when the control key is held, and two finger swipe (for browsing websites and photos). The scrolling action has "weight" like on the iPhone, so if you swipe and let go, the scrolling continues with a little momentum then slows to a stop. All in all, it's pretty neat. (On a side note, if you use the Magic Mouse in Boot Camp, the scrolling function doesn't currently work. You'll have to use another mouse in Vista or Windows 7 if you need scrolling action.)

The iMac comes with all the requisite green ratings: EPEAT Gold, Energy Star 5.0, corporate-sponsored take-back recycling programs, recyclability and energy efficiency. It uses about 120W while idling with the screen on and 150W while under load running CineBench. That may seem like a lot, but you also have to take the 27-inch screen into account. To put the numbers into perspective, the Lenovo ThinkCentre A62 (a previous Greentech award winner) used 150W by itself, independent of a screen. Overall that's pretty good. Therefore, the iMac 27-inch garners our Green Tech Approved rating.

As before, the iMac comes with the current version of iLife '09, including iPhoto, iTunes, GarageBand, iWeb, and iDVD. Neat programs like Photo Booth exist as diversions on the system. Unlike Windows PCs, there's no "bloatware" on the iMac (that is, extraneous trialware and adware programs that try to sell you stuff that you could otherwise download from the Internet). Rabid anti-Apple folk could argue that iTunes is there to entice you to buy music from the iTunes store or buy an iPod, but that's the closest thing to bloatware you'll find on the iMac. Believe me, a Microsoft Office 60-day trial or dial-up AOL and Earthlink on a Windows PC is much harder to deal with.
Apple iMac 27-inch (Core 2 Duo)

Performance
The system performs pretty well, though it's not significantly faster or slower than the previous Apple iMac (Nvidia GT130), which also had a 3.06-GHz Core 2 Duo processor in it, and it's certainly faster than the lower priced iMac (Nvidia GeForce 9400M). The new iMac completed the PhotoShop CS4 test in 1:57 running Mac OS X and 1:46 in Vista. This is pretty much the same as the previous iMac's scores (1:57 in OS X, 1:35 in Vista). Scores under two minutes are good for a dual-core system. I'm sure digital photo editors will appreciate the larger screen's resolution (2,560-by-1,440 up from 1,920-by-1,200 in its predecessor). The system is also pretty fast at 3D and day-to-day tasks: It scored 4,862 points at PCMark Vantage and 10,167 points at 3DMark Vantage (both tested in Vista). Last but not least, the system got a 59-second time in our Windows Media Encoder test, which is an excellent score (to get faster you'd need a quad-core processor). The iMac was pretty good at the 3D game tests, the system's racked up a somewhat playable 48 frames per second (fps) running Crysis at 1,280-by-1,024 resolution, and World in Conflict was smooth at 53fps at the same resolution. This put the iMac well ahead of any other system in its field. People that absolutely need more power should look at the Core i5 or Core i7 iMac models available later this year.

The 27-inch iMac's rivals are all trumped by its one defining attribute: the 27-inch screen. Even the humungous Averatec D1200 with its 25.5-inch screen is smaller than the iMac, and it also loses out on screen resolution. You'd be able to display so much more on the iMac's screen than on those of the D1200, the Gateway ZX6810-01 (23-inch), the HP TouchSmart 600-1055 (23-inch), or the Lenovo A600 (3011-4BU) (21.5-inch). All of the above offer 1080p HD resolution to be sure, but the iMac goes even further. In fact, in order to get more screen real estate, you would have to buy a 30-inch external display (2,560-by-1,600) for a tower PC.

The iMac is also faster than the above rivals, except for the quad-core equipped ZX6810-01. The Gateway is quite a bit cheaper, at only $1,400, but it's got a bunch of bloatware on it. The Averatec also costs much less ($999), but doesn't have the same cachet or computing power that the iMac has. The $1,399 Lenovo is closer in both pricing and functionality, but the A600 (3011-4BU)'s $699 brother, the A600, is a more compelling buy if you like that form factor. Last but not least, the HP TouchSmart 600-1055 is our current Editors' Choice, and it's the only competitor that can really give the iMac a run for its money. Sure it's got a smaller screen, but the HP's 23-inch display offers multitouch functionality, and no one does touch on the PC better than HP right now. The 600-1055 boasts a Blu-ray drive, plus Hulu and NetFlix built into its TouchSmart Home interface, so it's just as valid an entertainment PC as the iMac. The TouchSmart also offers HDMI and composite video connectors for your game console without the need for an adapter. The TouchSmart is $100 less expensive too, even with all the extras. It's a close call, but the TouchSmart retains our Editors' Choice for mainstream all-in-one desktops for now.

The Apple iMac 27-inch (Core 2 Duo) is certainly a class-defining product. It's got a huge screen, looks beautiful, and has some serious power under the hood. The system is clearly the winner if you're an Apple fan or need more screen real estate and a resolution greater than 1080p. Compared to its rivals, the iMac comes out mostly ahead, but HP's TouchSmart 600-1055 wins out with a slim lead in its feature set.


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Acer Aspire 5738DG-6165

The latest batch of Acer laptops are anything but ordinary. It started with a multitouch laptop that reaped the benefits of Windows 7's touch capabilities, and then came a netbook that dual-booted with Google's Android operating system. The Acer Aspire AS5738DG ($780 street) is a budget desktop replacement laptop, and apparently the next trick up the company's sleeve. Pre-installed with one of the first 3D widescreens, it comes with a pair of 3D glasses to match. While a number of the 3D effects were cool and the polarized screen didn't interfere with day-to-day tasks, everything around the AS5738DG is still pretty standard. Even without the nifty screen effects, it's an excellent laptop, with a price that works in its favor.

The AS5738DG is part of Acer's long-standing Gemstone series, which is basically clever marketing lingo that glorifies a polished plastic top. On top of that, it's a thick frame, measuring 15.1-by-9.9-by-1.4 inches (HWD), and lacks any kind of sex appeal. Its bland design is even harder to fathom when a dirt-cheap laptop like the $500 Acer Aspire AS5434-1958 has thinner and sleeker dimensions. Even comparable laptops like the HP Pavilion dv6t (1030us) and Gateway NV5807u are thinner-looking and designed more tastefully. It's not as boxy-looking as the Dell Studio 1555 (USE006CS), though, since its edges are rounded to look more oval than rectangular shaped.

Put On Your 3D Glasses
Perhaps the neatest gimmick this year, and a first on an inexpensive laptop such as the AS5738DG, is the built-in 3D hardware. It's laid on top of a generic-looking 15.6-inch widescreen that houses a 1,366-by-768 resolution (this resolution is a must for optimal 3D viewing). But put on a pair of stereoscopic 3D glasses—which, by the way, is included with your purchase—and your photos, games, and videos will supposedly jump out at you. DDD TriDef, the folks behind this 3D technology makes the necessary hardware and software that turns your 2D images, videos, and games into 3D content. TriDef preloads some already-converted content in this laptop, delivering the reach-out-and-grab-stuff effects convincingly. From your own personal collection of media files, you'll need TriDef's included software tools.
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It's not as bad as you think, though, particularly with a third-party tool and conversion times. There's no waiting involved for the conversions to happen—they're instantaneous. The only action required is that you have to open your photos, videos, and games through TriDef's Media Portal utility; launching them manually in Windows leaves out the desired 3D effects. I tested an assortment of photos in jpg and bitmap formats, as well as ones with varying resolutions—all of which rendered nicely to 3D, though I was constantly adjusting the way I was sitting and the physical angles of the screen. I also found that higher resolution photos had better physical 3D depth to them.
View Video

However, 2D videos and DVDs lacked any 3D depth. The 3D effects were difficult to detect while playing back various video formats, including WMV, AVI, and MPEG files. It doesn't recognize H.264 and MP4 files yet. Tridef's Web site lists and recommends the types of encoded content that will yield the best results. And it also has strict recommendations for playing back high definition content, which involves, and I quote: "Ask us first". Testing 1080p files in WMV formats proved that the 3D HD experience wasn't at all compelling. DVD playback software is also included in TriDef's utility and suffered the same limitations as other video file formats. If you're set on getting 3D to work with any sort of video, animations tend to produce the best results.

DirectX 9 capable games can also reap the benefits of 3D, and it's more compelling than photos and videos because the Direct X engine already contains all the necessary information for a high-quality 3D experience. DirectX 10, however, is currently not supported. Popular titles like Crysis and Call of Duty: World At War are part of an extensive list of games that have been tested to work with TriDef's software. And sure enough, a game like World in Conflict, which wasn't listed, didn't work as well off the bat. Like photos and videos, these games have to be launched within Tridef's software, and while the 3D effects weren't mind-blowing, they delivered a worthwhile 3D experience—at least more so than with photos and videos. You can switch the game back to 2D mode at any point by holding down the Alt+Shift+minus keys. There are plenty of other tweaks that can be performed to improve the 3D gaming experience; none of which, though, I had time to try out.

When the glasses come off and you exit out of TriDef's software, the appearance of the 15.6-inch widescreen, for the most part, looks like that of any laptop in its class (the polarized screen produces faint horizontal lines that can be detected if you look close enough). There's no hotkey that turns off the polarization either, but everyday tasks look absolutely fine.

Features
Despite a plain outer appearance, the interior is current with today's trends. The AS5738DG adopts the island keyboard format, where every key is isolated and slightly raised from its backbone. Having the keys slightly raised does have minor drawbacks, as crumbs or loose particles can find their way beneath the keys. The laptop is wide enough that it includes an adjacent numeric keypad, while the touchpad incorporates the same multi-touch gestures found in the AS5434-1958. I can do without the clicking noises from mouse buttons, though.

It has the usual set of features found in any desktop replacement within the $600-$800 price range. It has an HDMI-Out, which would've been omitted had the AS5738DG been priced beyond this range. Case in point: Both the AS5434-1958 ($500) and the Toshiba Satellite L505D-S6947 ($575) omit an HDMI-Out. It comes with four USB ports. The VGA-Out, Gigabit Ethernet port, 5-in-1 media card reader, and a webcam are features you would find in most budget desktop replacements. The 320GB hard drive is spacious and consistent in capacity with the dv6 (1030u) and the NV5807u. The Dell 1555, on the other hand, will let you bump up it up to 500GB.
Acer Aspire 5738DG-6165

Performance
The AS5738DG runs on a budget Intel processor—A 2.2GHz Core 2 Duo T6600—which is fast enough to satisfy average and sophisticated users alike. In fact, it's a higher-clocking processor than the ones found in the Dell 1555 (2.1GHz), HP dv6t-1030us (2GHz), and Gateway NV5807u (2.1GHz), so you're getting slightly faster speeds for about the same amount of money. Softening its budget specifications still is 4GB of DDR2 (1066MHz) memory and a decent ATI graphics card. Because of its higher-clocked processor, video encoding tests were in the AS5738DG's favor, beating all of its peers by a minimum of 10 seconds. It also achieved the highest score (5,075) in Cinebench R10—a memory- and CPU-intensive test.

With 3D graphics, the midrange ATI Mobility Radeon 4570 graphics card, with 512MB of VRAM, won't shatter any records. Although these specifications resulted in decent game play, I would advise against cranking up the eye-candy in games like World in Conflict and Crysis. With Crysis, I had to reduce most of the settings to "Medium" in order to prevent choppy frames. Likewise, game settings in World in Conflict had to be tempered for a smoother gaming experience. Compared with its peers, though, which run on Intel integrated graphics, the AS5738DG is a far better gaming machine.

So-so battery life is what you'd expect from a budget desktop replacement. The AS5738DG's 49Wh battery is the smallest among the laptops mentioned in this review. Still, it cranked out 3 hours 27 minutes in MobileMark 2007 tests, which places it in the middle of the pack. The Dell 1555 includes an 85Wh battery, which yielded 6 hours of battery life.

Put aside TriDef's 3D hardware, which could use some work in the video area but altogether delivered a worthwhile 3D experience, and judge the Acer Aspire AS5738DG as a budget desktop replacement first. It's priced very competitively, performed well, and comes with a decent graphics card when others in its class don't. The biggest thing that holds it back from besting our Editors' Choice, the Dell 1555, is that the Acer doesn't come close when it comes to battery life. Still, factoring in the 3D visuals, it's easy to see why Acer's gimmicks will differentiate their systems in the long run.

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HP Mini 311

Talk—there's been a lot of it ever since Nvidia announced that its Ion chipset would allow netbooks to run full 1080p movie clips, speed up video transcoding, and play 3D games. Lenovo and Samsung announced they would carry Ion-based netbooks, but both companies have yet to produce one for retail. Leave it to HP to take the initiative with the first Ion-based netbook on the market.

The HP Mini 311 ($470 direct) runs on an Intel Atom processor, but everything around it belongs to Nvidia, including the heralded Ion graphics. A slight catch, though: The 311 runs on the Ion LE version, where the "LE" is equivalent to an entry-level version of the Ion platform. Although 720p and 1080i (24 frames per second [fps]) movie clips played to perfection, 1080p (24fps) clips suffered some lag. And despite offering better frame rates than Intel-based graphics, most of our high-end games were virtually unplayable on the Mini 311. Furthermore, it's a little more expensive than your average netbook and its 5 hours of battery life fell well short of the 7-8 hour scores amassed by Intel-only netbooks. If your budget can only afford a netbook, but you still want to play and edit high definition videos, this is the model I would recommend.

Design
The Mini 311 is what you would call an oversized netbook. It's about the same size as the ASUS EeePC 1101HA, Acer Aspire One (A0751h), and Gateway LT3103u in that they all have 11.6-inch widescreens. At 3.3 pounds, it's the heaviest among its peers, although the differences are small. The Mini 311 is the prettiest though, as HP's signature imprints against a white background is delightful to look at. A black version is also available, though darker colors are usually a magnet for fingerprints and smudges. Alternatively, the Toshiba NB205 and HP Mini 5101 use textures and metals, respectively, to enhance their looks, as well as repel unsightly smudges.
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The Mini 311 is a bigger netbook than the Toshiba NB205 because it houses a bigger screen. Although 11.6-inch widescreens are building momentum in the netbook space, they, along with a 1,366-by-768 resolution, are still tough finds. Most 10-inch netbooks default to a lower, 1,024-by-768 resolution. Likewise, the Asus 1101HA, Gateway LT3103u, and Acer A0751h have matching screen sizes and resolutions. They're not even the biggest netbooks screens: Both the Lenovo IdeaPad S12 and Samsung NC20 (21GBK) use 12-inch widescreens and 1,280-by-800 resolutions.

Features
I would have been more impressed with the keyboard had it been full size. Both the Gateway LT3103u and Acer A0751h come with full size keyboards. Nevertheless, the 92% keyboard delivered a very good typing experience despite being slightly undersized. The touchpad is unusually wide and responsive, while the mouse buttons made these loud clicking noises.

The benefit of choosing Nvidia over an Intel platform is that HDMI-Out is supported natively, something you don't normally find in Atom-based netbooks. It can also drive 1,920-by-1,080 resolutions to a larger display. I tested the HDMI-Out with the Samsung LN55A950 LED display and it worked perfectly. Thanks to its size, the Mini 311 can also carry a VGA-Out, three USB ports, Nvidia's Ethernet, and a 5-in-1card reader. The 160GB hard drive is pretty much standard in netbooks these days. And there are plenty of wireless options as well, including Bluetooth, 802.11n Wi-Fi (most netbooks have just 802.11g), and embedded mobile broadband, which will cost you an extra $125.
HP Mini 311

Performance
What makes the Mini 311 special is that it runs an Nvidia chipset instead of the Intel chipset found on every other netbook on the market. It still needs a CPU, though. The 1.66GHz Intel Atom N280 is a commonly used netbook processor, which means in terms of raw horsepower, the Mini 311 isn't that far ahead of other netbooks. Video encoding tests finished in 4 minutes 54 seconds, which is about as fast the Toshiba NB205 (4:45) and Lenovo S12 (4:40). It's the fastest among its 11-inch peers, since the Asus 1101HA and Acer A0751h run on a more inferior Atom Z520 processor and the the Gateway LT3103u opts for an AMD low voltage CPU.

The Mini 311 has more oomph when it comes to graphics performance. The ION LE is basically a stripped down version of the Nvidia GeForce 9400M graphics chipset—the same chipset found in the Apple MacBook Air (Nvidia 9400GM). The "LE" portion means that support for Direct X is downgraded from 10 to 9. Its scores on 3DMark06, which I ran just to see what the performance would be, were in the same ball park as the MacBook Air and annihilated those of its netbook counterparts.

Despite these 3D benchmark scores, the combination of the Atom processor and lack of a Direct X 10-capable graphics chipset crippled games like World in Conflict and Crysis—both of these games lagged to the point where they were unplayable. Games like World of Warcraft and Mini Ninjas, which have lower graphics requirements, were lag-free and absolutely playable. The gravy was supposed to be in high definition playback. I tested several HD movie clips on the 311, as well as playing them to the Samsung LN55A950 HDTV. It handled all of my 720p and 1080i (24 fps) clips with great color accuracy, good picture detail, and they didn't suffer from any lag. When playing 1080p (24fps) movie clips in H264 and WMV formats, however, there was noticeable lag. Let's just say it wasn't a smooth experience.

From time to time, I could hear the fans running, presumably to dissipate the extra heat emitted by the graphics chipset. And even though its 6-cell, 53Wh battery is roughly the same capacity as the one found in the Toshiba NB205 and HP 5101, its score of 5 hours 29 minutes on MobileMark 2007 is about 2 to 3 hours less than that of the competition. Still, more than 5 hours of battery life is very respectable.

By netbook standards, the HP Mini 311 is reasonably priced and offers features most netbooks lack. You're paying a small premium for a netbook that has an HDMI port and can drive 1080p resolutions to a bigger display. Though it didn't deliver on 1080p playback, it handled 720p and 1080i videos better than netbooks with Intel-based graphics. For those who were hoping to make a gaming netbook out of this, think again. High-end 3D games are still best played on full-fledged laptops.


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Acer Aspire One AOD250 (Android)

Netbook sales have helped catapult Acer to second place in PC shipments worldwide, according to IDC. And the Aspire One AOD250 is easily one of Acer's best selling netbooks to date. It's hardly the ideal netbook, though, as plenty of others have caused it to lose some momentum by promising—and delivering—bigger keyboards, larger screens, and a bevy of other features. Well, this little netbook is about to push back. For the first time, the Aspire One AOD250 (Android) ($350 street) is offering a dual-boot system. Yeah, you'd expect Windows XP to be there, but Google Android? Now that's something nobody has done yet. Sadly, Google's hyped-up Linux OS is not enough to make a big contender out of this netbook.

Design
With a Ruby Red chassis, the AOD250 (Android)'s high-gloss top may look appealing, but this design has been beaten to death by netbooks such as the Lenovo IdeaPad S10 (Red), HP Mini 110 (1030US), and Asus EeePC 1000HE. These days, the use of metals and textures, such as with the HP Mini 5101 and Toshiba mini NB205, is what turns heads. If red isn't your cup of tea, the AOD250 is also available in Sapphire Blue, Diamond Black, and Seashell White.

In terms of its thickness, Acer shaved off a good deal of plastic from the original Acer Aspire One (10-inch);, so it's new and improved measurements (10.2 by 8. by 1 inches, HWD) make it as slim as those of the Toshiba NB205 and HP 5101. Despite bundling a 57Wh (6-cell battery), which sticks out about an inch from the back, the AOD250 (Android) is still one of the lightest netbooks in town; at 2.7 pounds, it's a shade lighter than the Toshiba NB205 (2.9 lbs) and HP 5101 (2.9 lbs).

Android Dissected
No matter how you slice it, Android is a Linux-based operating system. It'll look foreign at first, but Acer did its best to make this early release intuitive. Dual-booting Google's Android operating system isn't that bold when you can leave at anytime and head back to Windows XP Home Edition. Acer already made that mistake once by shipping a netbook with only Linux installed, and it suffered a high return rate because of it.

A reboot is required to enter Android. When you're in Windows XP, there's an Android configuration tool right on the desktop, which lets you activate the Android OS so that it's the first thing that boots. Within this tool, you can also log into your Google account, create POP mail accounts, automate software updates, and recover Android if anything goes wrong.

There are four "gadgets" visible on the main screen in Android, they include Google Talk, FireFox's Web browser, Webmail, and Calendar. What looks like a peel-off tab on the top left corner gets you back into Windows XP, in case frustration builds—and it will. On the far right is a slide-out tab that houses a drawer filled with 20 other gadgets that control anything from system settings, your music files and photo, Webcam, Gmail, etc.

The Escape, Arrow, and Enter keys are your closest allies in this operating system. Any time you get lost or get too deep into an application, you can ESC-key back out into the home page. Whether it's punching in Wi-Fi settings, changing the wallpaper, or customizing power management settings, these tasks are made simple by Android. All the options are laid out in big gray tabs, where it's just a matter of clicking them with your mouse button or hitting the Enter key.

Setting up a Gmail and hotmail accounts were simple. You don't have look for incoming and outgoing server addresses; just punch in your username and password, and Android configures and gets mail in your inbox in a matter of seconds. You can receive e-mails with attachments, as long as they're media files (there is currently no document support in this release, and Android Marketplace is not available in this build, so you can't purchase and download a document editing program; you can e-mail Word documents or spreadsheets, but Android won't recognize them). With Google Talk and Google Calendar access, you'll need to have an account ready before you can run them in Android. FireFox is your Web browser, which handled most Websites the same way a Windows version would, including sites like Youtube, Flickr, Facebook, and Twitter. A Web site like Hulu, however, didn't work because Adobe Flash Player 10 won't be available for Android until next year.

Android won't let you browse through your USB thumb drives, there's no printer support, and sometimes the system would boot straight to XP even though Android is set to boot first. Sometimes, certain key commands wouldn't register in Google Search or FireFox's Web browser. Unlike Android SmartPhones, Marketplace is not available for application downloads, so adding functionality to this Android build is very limited. As with past Linux operating systems, the advantages of having one are for quicker boot times and better battery savings than Windows XP. Otherwise, Android for netbooks has a long way to go before it can work alone.

Cramped Keyboard, Standard Features
As for the hardware, the AOD250 (Android) is quickly falling behind other netbook makers. The 10.1-inch widescreen is left intact from previous versions, as well as its drab 1,024-by-600 resolution. Netbooks like the HP 5101 and Sony VAIO VPC-W11XX are entering the 10-inch space with 1,366-by-768 resolutions. On top of that, the AOD250 (Android)'s 89% keyboard currently ranks as one of smallest and most cramped. The average is holding steady at 92% of full size, with the Asus 1000HE, HP Mini 110 (1030US), and Dell Inspiron Mini 10v leading the way. There are exceptions, of course, such as the full size keyboards found in the Toshiba NB205 and Samsung N120 (12GBK).

Compounding the typing experience is the navigating one, which consists of the teeny tiny touchpad and mouse buttons. Unless you have the hands of a small child, their proportions are simply too small and too frustrating to use. By comparison, the mouse buttons on the Toshiba NB205 are nearly twice their size, and those on the HP 5101 and Asus 1000HE deserve honorable mentions as well.

Nothing stands out in its feature set either. There are three USB ports, VGA-Out, Ethernet, and media card reader—a common list found across most netbooks. At least the Lenovo S10 (Red) threw in an ExpressCard slot, while the 5101 has options for embedded 3G modems and an SSD drive. As with previous Acer One netbooks, the AOD250 (Android)'s hard drive tops out at 160GB.
Acer Aspire One AOD250 (Android)

Long Battery Life
Since its previous iteration, the AOD250 (Android) has moved up a notch in the Intel Atom hierarchy. The 1.66GHz Intel Atom N280 is the top of the line, though I use those words very loosely. It doesn't outperform the lower-clocked 1.6GHz Intel Atom N270 by all that much. With only 1GB of DDR2 memory, the AOD250 (Android)'s performance scores are no better or worse than its Atom-based peers. Having said that, its 4-minute 26-second video encoding score beat that of both the Toshiba NB205 (4:45) and HP 5101 (4:40) by a margin that doesn't really impact real-life scenarios. Any netbook that runs on either the N270 or N280 processor—which is most of them—will see similar performance scores across the board.

The biggest differentiator among netbooks is battery life. The AOD250 (Android) ships with a 57Wh (6-cell battery), which is similar in capacity as that of the NB205 (63Wh), Dell Mini 10v (56Wh), and HP 5101 (55Wh). In MobileMark 2007 tests, it drained its battery in 6 hours 21 minutes, which is well above average for a netbook. Granted, it falls short of the 7-8 hour scores achieved by the Toshiba NB205 (8:27) and the 5101 (7:20), but 6 hours is more than enough for any average or hardcore user.

Acer realized that netbooks have already reached a saturation point, so it reaches out to Google for its Android OS—an operating system that has found some success in SmartPhone but has yet to find a home in laptops. Despite making the Aspire One AOD250 (Android) a dual-boot system with Windows XP Home Edition, Android is basically a semi-functional Linux operating system that still needs more polishing. Even though the AOD250 (Android) left its price untouched ($350), the hardware—specifically the keyboard and surrounding parts—doesn't break new ground like the Toshiba NB205 and HP mini 5101.

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Acer Aspire One (D250-1958)

The Aspire One is one of many netbooks under Acer's arsenal and has had a huge hand in helping the company rise to the number two spot in PC shipments worldwide, according to IDC. But with plenty of newcomers entering the netbook market with systems featuring bigger keyboards, larger screens and more features, the Aspire One model is starting to look, well, dated.Granted, the one of the newest iterations, the Acer Aspire One (D250-1958) ($319 list) is one of the cheapest netbooks money can buy, but you're better off spending the extra money on more qualified ones, like the Toshiba mini NB205 or the HP Mini 5101.

Design
Dressed in Sapphire Blue, the D250-1958's high gloss chassis is, frankly, nothing new. Other netbooks such as the Lenovo IdeaPad S10 (Red), HP Mini 110 (1030US), and ASUS EeePC 1000HE use this type of design, which means it no longer stands out. A more innovative approach would have been to incorporate metals and textures, as seen in the HP Mini 5101 and Toshiba mini NB205. To be fair, the D250-1958 is available in a variety of colors, including Diamond Black, Ruby Red, and Seashell White.

At 10.2-by-8.4-by-1 inches (HWD) the D250-1958 is considerably thinner than the original Acer Aspire One (10-inch), making it as slim as the Toshiba NB205 and HP 5101. While the 58Wh (6-cell) battery sticks out an inch from the back, the D250-1958 is still one of the lightest netbooks out there; at 2.7 pounds, it's a bit lighter than Toshiba NB205 (2.9 lbs) and HP 5101 (2.9 lbs).

Features
The 10.1-inch widescreen, with its drab 1,024-by-600 resolution, is a holdover from previous versions. In comparison, other 10-inch netbooks like the HP 5101 and Sony VAIO VPC-W11XX are already offering 1,366-by-768 resolutions. The D250's 89-percent keyboard is one of smallest and most cramped. The average size for netbook keyboards seems to be 92 percent of full size, as seen on the ASUS 1000HE, the HP Mini 110 (1030US), and Dell Inspiron Mini 10v. The Toshiba NB205 and Samsung N120 (12GBK) are bucking the trend with full-size keyboards.

The ghastly typing experience is exacerbated by the practically miniscule touchpad and mouse buttons. Their proportions are simply too small and too frustrating to use (unless, of course, you have very, very small hands). The ones in Toshiba NB205, meanwhile are nearly twice their size, while the ones in HP 5101 and ASUS 1000HE are also a good size.

The D250-1958's feature set is pretty standard—three USB ports, VGA-Out, Ethernet port, and a media card reader. At least you got an ExpressCard slot with the Lenovo S10 (Red), while the 5101 offers options for embedded 3G modems and an SSD drive. As with previous Acer One netbooks, the D250-1958's hard drive maxes out at 160GB. The one silver lining is the standard two-year parts and labor warranty that comes with any Costco computer configuration.
Acer Aspire One (D250-1958)

Performance
The 1.6GHz, Intel Atom N270 is slightly under-clocked, a notch below the 1.66GHz N280 CPU. In terms of actual speed, however, this minor difference won't impact real-world performance. With only 1GB of DDR2 memory, its performance scores are on a par with its Atom-based peers. It scored 4 minute 46 seconds in our video encoding tests, trailing the NB205 (4:45) and the 5101 (4:40) by a small margin. Basically, any netbook that runs on either the N270 or N280 processor—which is most of them—will see similar performance scores across the board.

Perhaps it's in battery life that the D250-1958 distinguishes itself somewhat. The D250-1958 ships with a 58Wh (6-cell battery), which is similar in capacity as that of the Toshiba NB205 (63Wh), Dell Mini 10v (56Wh), and HP 5101 (55Wh). In MobileMark 2007 tests, it drained its battery in 6 hours 32 minutes, well above average for a netbook. Granted, it falls short of the 7-8 hour scores achieved by the Toshiba NB205 (8:27) and HP 5101 (7:20), but 6 and a half hours is more than enough for any user.

Even though the Acer Aspire One (D250-1958) is priced ($319) to fly off the shelves, it's also important to realize its limitations. Specifically, the keyboard and navigating components are in need of some serious upgrades before it can measure up to leading netbooks like the Toshiba mini NB205 and the HP mini 5101.

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X71A

Ideal Personal Digital Entertainment Solution
Ideal Personal Digital Entertainment SolutionThe X71A notebook is the ideal personal digital entertainment solution. It offers powerful computing capabilities, complete digital multimedia applications and wireless audio and video communication all at one affordable price. Now it´s possible to have your very own home theater, computer and game console all in one sleek and portable smart machine.


Dual core, Double Power
Equipped with the latest dual core processing, the X71A provides enhanced responsiveness to enjoy audio & video playback & record, gaming, IM, and web-browsing simultaneously on your notebook. Moreover, it offers outstanding dual-core performance to enjoy multimedia management and digital content creation. X71A is performed to convert your laptop into a home studio to manage, play, encode digital audio *CPU features available may very in each region
Cinematic Visual Experience

Incorporated with the latest graphic technologies from ASUS, the large 17.1" widescreen X71A not only offers complete visual satisfaction but also beautiful displays for both work and play. Moreover, with Intel int. GMA X4500HD X71A delivers the ultimate experience for the following four key uses: Media Center PCs, Digital TVs, High Definition Discs (ie Blu-Ray & HD-DVD), and High Fidelity Digital Imaging (digital video and pictures).

Omni bearing Audio/ Video Interface - HDMI

HDMI supports standard, enhanced, or high-definition video, plus multi-channel digital audio on a single cable. It transmits all ATSC HDTV standards and supports 8-channel digital audio, and with 5Gbps of bandwidth, HDMI can accommodate future enhancements and requirements.
Catch Your Favorite TV Programs on the Notebook*

ASUS has once again demonstrated its advanced engineering ability with the X71A built-in DVB-T (Digital Video Broadcasting-Terrestrial) feature. With hybrid (analog + DVB-T) built-in TV tuner, wireless TV broadcasting right out of the notebook is possible whenever and wherever. *Availability of this feature may vary in each region.

ASUS Express Gate - 8 Seconds Boot Up*and Instant Online

In addition to the unique technologies and software features, X71A unveils the latest Express Gate that empowers users with the simplest usage experience. This additional built-in operating system enables ultra fast boot up for access to a host of most commonly used features, including web browser, instant messenger, Skype, photo manager, music player and online gaming

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CG6155

The Ultimate Gaming Power Station
Catering to gamers who require only the best equipment, ASUS Gaming System CG6155 comprises an array of top-notch features to provide gamers with the performance and stability for their every gaming need.




Designed to Dominate the Battlefield

The unique exterior design is inspired by ancient and modern armor with both Eastern and Western influences, and presents an aesthetic appeal that exudes pure power! CG6155 not only looks bullet proof; but also incorporates an arsenal of features which make it one of the most stable and secure gaming PC systems ever.

Fastest Processing Speed Than Ever
Imagine the speed when four processing engines run at full or even overclocked speeds at the same time. With the latest 45nm Intel® Core™2 Extreme CPU, CG6155 can easily handle multitasks and heavy data processing. ASUS factory overclocking raises processor's performance up to 33% and further pushes system's performance to the limit, but at the same time, CG6155 underwent strict quality test procedures to guarantee excellent system stability.*The overclocking performance changes are subject to different setups and conditions

Dual Power - Guaranteed Power Supply for OC Enjoyment
ASUS' unique dual power supply module supports up to a maximum of 2 kilowatts power output, which is two times larger than the competitor-average 1 kilowatts power supply, to provide sufficient energy for all the powerful components and ensure excellent system stability under extreme overclocking operations. The module's fail-over function prevents sudden shut down by maintaining sustainable power output even when one power supply fails.

Optimized Thermal - Liquid-Cooling Module

Cool operation environment is crucial for extreme performance system. In order to provide the most effective heat dissipation, CG6155 adopts advanced liquid-cooling module, which not only allows better overclocking performance but also reduce the noise to the minimum level.
Exclusive Hot Game Bundle – Alone in the Dark

The original ?Alone in the Dark? video game was the first game to launch survival gaming as a genre; and this latest version once again sets the standard with a heart-stopping survival experience realized through state-of-the-art real-time physics and unprecedented environmental interaction. Incorporating Twilight technology and a full fledged rendering engine, the game creates a lavishly detailed world filled with highly realistic and advanced cinematographic effects.

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ASUS Preps Two USB 3.0/SATA 6.0 Gbps

The personal computer concept has evolved significantly over the past few years, as new technologies bring increased performance into the hands of a wider number of users. Today's desktop platforms can deliver support for the latest high-end components, enabling computer enthusiasts to take advantage of an increased computing performance.
On that note, a number of motherboard manufacturers are preparing to release new platforms that will provide users with support for the upcoming USB 3.0 and SATA 6.0 Gbps connectivity interfaces. Such is the case with two of ASUS' upcoming boards, the P7P55D-E Premium and the P6X58D Premium.

Both of these products have been featured with support for Intel's latest processors and also with SATA 6.0Gbps and USB 3.0 ports. As you have probably noticed from the names of the two boards, these two are built on Intel's P55 and X58 chipsets, respectively. This essentially means that they will support the latest LGA 1156 and LGA 1366-compatible processors, including the new Core i5 and Core i7 CPUs, as well as the upcoming Core i3 models, designed for the mainstream market.

ASUS is also preparing to roll out the new P6X58D Premium mobo
Enlarge picture
Aside from that, the two boards have also been designed to support the Intel TurboV overclocking technology, which should come in handy for those users looking to extend their system's performance by tweaking the clock speed of the processor. The platforms have support for DDR3 memory technology and the aforementioned SATA 6.0 Gbps interface and also come with 7.1 channel audio, Gigabit Ethernet and two (P7P55D-E Premium) or three (P6X58D Premium) PCI Express x16 slots.

According to details that have been made available on the Internet, the two boards should make their market debut sometime next month, although pricing is yet to be unveiled. The final specifications could change, but there's a pretty good chance that the pictured designs are final and that computer enthusiasts will be able to enjoy the features and performance of the new ASUS motherboards.

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Hands-on with Sony's VAIO W Netbook

With Windows 7 freshly launched, several PC vendors have updated their product portfolios with new solutions designed to provide consumers with full support for the latest operating system. Such is the case with Sony, which has recently announced its product lineup for this fall, with new models designed with the latest technologies and boasting the aforementioned OS.
On that note, we were recently at a Sony VAIO press event, where the company showcased all of its latest products, including the small and compact VAIO W, the company's first netbook product. We had a few brief moments with the said VAIO and we can provide you with an insight on what to expect from the small machine.

As a quick reminder, the specifications of the new Sony VAIO W netbook are pretty much the same as those of the majority of today's netbook PCs, especially since this is a PC that is based on the popular Intel Atom platform. The netbook is featured with an Intel Atom N280 CPU, clocked at 1.66GHz and coupled with 1GB of RAM and the Intel GMA 950 graphics chip. Additional features include the USB 2.0, LAN, WLAN 802.11 a/b/g/ Draft n and Bluetooth connectivity, a 10.1-inch LCD with X-Black technology and a weight of 1.19kg, battery included.

Hands-on with Sony's VAIO W netbook
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The overall feeling of the netbook is of a high-quality product. The keyboard is easy to use and all the connectivity options are easily accessible. The VAIO W isn't the thinnest design in its category, but it does make up for that with high-quality materials and a software bundle that is designed to enable users to have an overall better computing experience.

The system is, obviously, running the Windows 7 operating system and also comes with a number of Sony's own software applications, including the VAIO Gate we pictured below. This provides consumers with a faster access to some of the most used applications on the computer system. Although it runs on the much-appreciated OS, you should not forget that we are still talking about an Atom-powered netbook, which means performance isn't that high.

Sonny Vaio


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Acer Preps Aspire 1420P Multi-Touch

Windows 7 is approximately one day old, but the much-anticipated OS has already spawned a number of new computer systems announced by PC vendors that want to gain on the momentum that the new OS has created. Following in the footsteps of its main competitors, Acer has recently detailed its upcoming Aspire multi-touch tablet PC, pre-loaded with the fresh new Microsoft operating system. The new machine is expected
to expand the company's portfolio, which also includes the 1820P, part of the Timeline series.

Dubbed Aspire 1420p, the new ultraportable, convertible tablet PC from Acer has just been showcased by the company at a press event in Taiwan. According to the details offered by a related article on Engadget, the new laptop will be featured with an 11.6-inch touchscreen display, featuring a resolution of 1366 x 768 pixels. On the inside, the laptop is powered by an Intel Celeron or Core 2 Duo ULV processor, coupled with up to 8GB of RAM, a 250/320GB hard drive and the Intel GMA 4500MHD integrated graphics chip.

The upcoming Aspire tablet also includes a multi-in-one card reader, Gigabit Ethernet and wireless 802.11b/g/Draft-N with optional Bluetooth and 3G. The system also comes with a multi-gesture touchpad, an Acer Crystal Eye webcam, HDMI output and a 6-cell battery pack that is said to be capable of providing the end-user with up to 8 hours of battery life. Obviously, the real-life battery results are different, but the laptop should manage to deliver at least 4 hours of runtime.

As expected, the machine will be pre-loaded with Windows 7 and is likely to become available next month, in three colors, namely Diamond Black, Sapphire Blue and Ruby Red. Unfortunately, we will have to wait a bit for the pricing details.

Acer Is Empowering People

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MSI's Wind Top AE2220 Officially

MSI, one of Taiwan's largest manufacturers of computer components and personal computer systems, has recently announced the official debut of its new Wind Top all-in-one computer system, the previously leaked AE2220. Designed to provide consumers with full support for Microsoft's latest Windows 7 operating system, the AE2220 Wind Top has been packed with a large 21.5-inch touchscreen display, featuring a multi-touch technology and some of the latest hardware components available on the market.

The new desktop PC offers a choice for consumers who would like to enjoy the full Windows 7 experience on a touchscreen-capable PC that offers the necessary performance to easily support today's latest applications. MSI's Wind Top AE2220 has been designed as an all-in-one PC that combines an Intel processor with the integrated graphics solution provided by NVIDIA's GeForce 9300 chip.

MSI rolls out the Wind Top AE2220 all-in-one PC with multitouch display
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As far as technical specifications go, the new system can be configured with a dual-core Pentium T4300 processor, clocked at 2.1GHz, or a Core 2 Dup T6600 CPU working at a speed of 2.2GHz. Said processor options can be coupled with up to 4GB of RAM, a 320 or 640GB hard drive and the GeForce 9300 integrated graphics. Additional features that are available for the new all-in-one PC include the DVD writer, the 1.3MP webcam, two 5W speakers and 6-in-1 memory card reader. On the connectivity side, the system is featured with Gigabit Ethernet, WiFi, both D-Sub and HDMI outputs and an optional hybrid TV Tuner.

The new all-in-one system from MSI has already been listed in Europe and is available for pre-order for a starting price tag of 799 Euro. The Wind Top AE2220 could turn out to be a noteworthy choice for those looking to purchase a home computer that can deliver performance and useful features in a compact form factor.


MSI



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Dell Silently the CULV-Based Inspiron 13z

Round Rock, Texas-based Dell, one of the world's leading vendors of personal computer systems, has recently updated its product portfolio with the addition of a new portable PC, part of the company's growing line of Inspiron laptops. The new model, dubbed Inspiron 13z, is part of the PC vendor's new line of Inspiron Z series of ultra-thin laptops, which the company debuted back in August with the launch of the 11z model. The new addition comes to provide users with an ultra-portable, lightweight PC that packs the performance specifications of Intel's latest CULV platform.


The new Dell Inspiron 13z laptop has been featured with a small-size 13.3-inch display that boasts a LED-backlit technology and a 1366 x 768 pixel resolution. The machine has been featured with an Intel Pentium Dual Core SU4100 processor, but can also be configured with a Core 2 Duo SU7300 CPU, both of which can be coupled with up to 6GB of RAM and the increasingly familiar GMA X4500MHD Intel integrated graphics.

The laptop also offers a choice for a better, GeForce G105M graphics card with 512MB of memory, providing end-users with a better graphics support. Additional features include a choice for a 250GB or a 320GB hard drive, a built-in DVD writer, Gigabit Ethernet, WiFi with optional Bluetooth, a 7-in-1 card reader and a choice for a 4-cell or an 8-cell battery pack. According to available details, choosing the latter will provide end-users with up to 11 hours and 23 minutes of runtime, which is pretty great for an ultraportable laptop.

As you can expect, the new Inspiron 13z laptop comes pre-loaded with Microsoft's latest Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit operating system and can already be ordered from Dell in UK.

Dell
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Sony VAIO X-Series

Early this September, at the IFA 2009 show, in Berlin, Germany, Sony, one of the world's largest vendors of consumer electronics and computing products, announced a couple of new additions to its line of VAIO laptops, including a more interesting model in the form of the VAIO X, touted as the “world's lightest” portable computer system. Not much was made public at IFA about the specifications of said machine, but early this month Sony came through with the tech specs of the new system. On that note, we were recently offered a chance to a hands-on experience with said VAIO, at a Sony press event, where the company showcased its fall lineup.

Although Sony unveiled models such as the AW, NW, CW or the W netbook series, the main attraction of the event, undoubtedly, was the VAIO X ultraportable laptop. Designed as a mix of a netbook and an ultraportable PC, the new VAIO is claimed to be the world's thinnest laptop. And we were certainly convinced of that when we got our chance to play a little with it.

According to Sony, this new machine has been designed as a next-generation alternative to the company's previous TT and TZ series, providing end-users with a thinner, more lightweight solution. The thin and light design of the laptop has been enabled by the system's internal configuration, which includes an Atom 550 processor, clocked at 2GHz, 2GB of RAM, large-capacity 256GB SATA SSD, coupled with Intel's GMA 500 graphics chipset. There's also an 11.1-inch WXGA with X-Black technology and a number of connectivity options, including Everywair WAN 7.2Mbps (3G), USB 2.0, LAN, WLAN 802.11 a/b/g/Draft n and Bluetooth.

The model we had a chance to play with was based on an Intel Atom Z540 processor, which is clocked at a lower 1.86GHz clock speed. The system was running on 2GB of RAM and the Windows 7 32-bit operating system, pretty much what you will get for the lowest-priced configuration. While we were impressed by the system's overall exterior design, the performance, even in Windows 7, was rather sluggish, especially when dealing with all those neat Windows 7 features, like the Aero interface.

Sony

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Getac

Windows 7 is the buzz word this week, as the Redmond, Washington-based software giant is preparing to officially debut the much-anticipated OS. With the launch of the new OS, a number of PC vendors are rallying up their product portfolios to support Windows 7, which is the case with rugged PC-designer Getac. The company has recently announced no less than six new rugged products, all of which are compatible and will run on the much-anticipated OS.


“Working closely with Microsoft, we were able to voice the needs of our customers to ensure that our resistive Multi-touch function works hand-in-hand with their Windows 7 operating system. We have seen the excitement over the launch of Windows 7 increase exponentially and are excited to be a part of it right from the start,” said Jim Rimay, president of Getac Inc. “In addition, we continue to advance our technology with the introduction of the Getac V100, the industrial's first rugged laptop with resistive multi-touch panel. We will soon enable this feature to our full product line.”

According to Getac, the company has worked together with Microsoft so that its line of rugged products will provide customers with support for a full Windows 7 experience. The much anticipated OS, which is due out on October 22, will be made available on a range of Getac rugged products, including the A790, M230, V100, B300 and 9213. The company also announced that its rugged products would provide consumers with multi-touch support, while Microsoft's Windows 7 will enhance the Resistive Multi-Touch technology that has been recently introduced on the rugged laptops.

Windows 7 is scheduled to debut on October 22, two days from now, which is when Getac will provide its customers with the updated line of rugged notebooks and tablet PCs, boasting the much-anticipated OS. The updated line is expected to deliver an overall better performance, mainly thanks to the specific features that have been built inside the new OS.

Getac
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Acer Aspire 5738DG

Acer, one of the world's top vendors of portable computer systems, has recently announced the debut of its new Aspire 5738DG laptop, designed to provide users with full support for the features that have been enabled in Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system, which has been launched today. The new laptop has been designed on the latest Intel Core 2 Duo processors and also features Dolby surround sound technology, providing end-users with a level of multimedia experience that should make some replace their desktop PCs with the new Acer laptop. In addition, the new notebook comes with a 3D viewing technology.


“This holiday season, we are seeing 3D content become more prevalent in popular films and games,” said Ray Sawall, senior manager of product marketing for Acer America. “The new Acer Aspire 5738DG notebook enables consumers to enjoy exciting new 3D entertainment on a mobile PC that can also replicate a 3D experience from standard 2D content. This product upholds Acer’s strong tradition of combining innovation with value by delivering leading-edge technology at an affordable price that makes it accessible to the average consumer.”

Acer unveils new 3D Aspire laptop
The laptop has been featured with a 15.6-inch HD 1366 x 768 pixel resolution, boasting Acer's CineCrystal LED-backlit TFT LCD technology with integrated TriDef 3D screen. Built on Intel's PM45 Express chipset, the new machine comes with an Intel Core 2 Duo T6600 processor, clocked at 2.2GHz and combined with 4GB of DDR2 and a 320GB hard drive. Additional features include a multi-in-1 media card reader, wireless 802.11 b/g/n Acer InvLink technology, 8x DVD-Super Multi double-layer optical drive, integrated Acer Crystal Eye webcam, multi-gesture touchpad, four USB 2.0 ports and a 6-cell battery pack.

Acer's Aspire 5738DG has been featured with an HD display that is coated with a special 3D film that enables the laptop to deliver a 3D image. The solution works with the addition of the included 3D polarizer eyeglasses and the TriDref media player. Price-wise, the laptop is expected to have an MSRP of US$799.99.

Acer Is Empowering People
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ViewSonic Based ViewBook Laptops

Just like the majority of the world's biggest laptop vendors, ViewSonic is also planning to expand its line of portable computer systems with the introduction of a new line of ViewBook PCs, designed to provide consumers with a choice for an ultraportable, ultra-thin laptop that boasts Intel's already famous CULV platform. The new lineup is expected to be launched by the end of this month, and will be available in a range of form factors, starting with the increasingly popular 12.1-inch and going all the way up to 14-inch.

The specific technical details of the new laptops aren't yet available, but according to available info they will all be pre-loaded with Microsoft's fresh new operating system, the much-appreciated Windows 7 OS, and its Home Premium version. Powered by Intel's latest CULV processors, all models are expected to boast at least 2GB of RAM, coupled with a hard drive that should deliver a minimum of 320GB of storage capacity.

All new ViewBook laptops, which include the 12.1-inch ViewBook 120, the 13.3-inch VB 130 and VB Pro, and the 13-inch VB 140, will be featured with LED-backlit screens and will become available with a screen resolution of 1366 by 768 pixels. From all the new models, Viewsonic had decided to feature the 13.3-inch ViewBook Pro with an aluminum enclosure and a built-in optical DVD writer. Unfortunately, this is pretty much everything we know about this latest lineup at this time.

All of the new ViewBook laptops are expected to make their debut by the end of this month, or October 30th, to be more specific. Price wise, you are looking at systems that come with a starting US$679, US$769, US$1,016 and US$1,077, for the VB Pro with the built-in optical drive.

ViewSonic

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